Unbroken Glasses

Meagan Gorton Another image that struck me from TheBook of Daniel was the description of Pauly, Daniel’s father as he wasbeing beaten by the mob while he on the bus. I was intrigued by the fact that although the crowd wasbreaking his arm and causing other horrible injuries to him, he calmly removedhis glasses and handed them off to Mindish. I was impressed by the calmness ofhis actions for he not only handed them off but also managed to fold themclosed before doing so. I think this is a poignant example of Pauly’s innerstrength. Its almost as if his moral conviction allows him to transcend thephysical world and removes him from the pain that the mob is inflicting on him.He confronts the mob and tells the others, “we cannot permit this outrage.” (p.50) He is unafraid to place himself in grave harms way because he believes thatit is the right


How many lawyers does it take to keep OJ Simpson out of trouble?

In the least shocking news of the decade, OJ Simpson hired a new lawyer. However, this time, it is not without a sense of irony. OJ Simpson is currently serving nine to thirty-three years in Nevada state prison for kidnapping and armed robbery charges. OJ’s newest lawyer alleges that his conviction was solely due to how badly he was represented by his last two lawyers at both the trial and appeals level. There is a certain peculiarity to that last sentence. Having ‘OJ’ and ‘badly represented’ in the same sentence just seems weird, doesn’t it? OJ Simpson, of course, is famous for having possibly the most highly publicized trial in history. Each day, the nation would stay glued to its TV and watch a Kardashian do something that required a college degree. Heavy hitters like Johnny Cochran captivated the nation. We were introduced to the infamous phrase, “If the gloves


The Same-Sex Marriage Tight Rope

President Obama made headlines last week when he appeared on ABC News and declared that he believed that same-sex couples should be allowed to get married. Newsweek quickly donned President Obama ‘The First Gay President’ and The New Yorker ran a cover with White House columns transformed into the colors of the gay pride flag. Much was made about this single statement – to wit, the first of its kind by a sitting president – endorsing same-sex marriage. But what really was said? The text of the statement by President Obama was as follows: “I’ve just concluded that for me, personally, it is important for me to go ahead and affirm that same-sex couples should be able to get married.” No one is going to discount the potential positive ramifications this statement could have on today’s youth, LGBT community at large, and the inspirational feelings that this statement may engender


Crimes Against Football

The biggest story of this NFL offseason has been “BountyGate”. An NFL investigation revealed that from 2009 to 2011, the New Orleans Saints and coaches operated a fund that paid out bounties for hits that injured opposing players, even if they were illegal hits. Several couches were suspended; the defensive coordinator who created and headed the program was suspended indefinitely, and the head coach of the team is suspended for one year. The overall initial reaction of players around the league and the media was that the penalties were harsh, but understandable in order to protect the integrity of the league and the safety of players. The coaches were the ones in charge, and it was their responsibility to stop things like this from happening, not to start them. After further investigating the scandal, the NFL also decided to suspend 4 players. The most notable suspension was handed down to


Book of Daniel, the courts, and funeral homes

Meagan Gorton While reading The Book of Daniel I was struck by onof Daniel’s descriptions of his adoptive parents. He talks about how civilityis important to them, that it is the essence of being human. (p.27) Mr. Lewin is chastisingDaniel for being nasty to Dr. Duberstein and they expect Daniel toapologize. What I find interestingis that although Daniel is going through an emotional ordeal, he is expected toremain polite and respectful. There are societal rules he must follow and thereis no room to express what he is actually feeling. He cannot lash out for this would be rude, even though hissister has recently tried to kill herself. He must maintain his poker face even though he may be ingreat emotional pain. Ican’t help but think how this is similar to the court of law. In this venue,public decorum and civility are paramount and loud displays of emotion areabsolutely not tolerated.


Don't Point That Camera at Me

Whether you’ve got the newest iPhone, Droid, Blackberry, or even a flip phone from five years ago, chances are it has a camera, and accordingly, great power. Although the prevalence of recording technology can infringe upon privacy, it can also serve as a convenient, potent tool capable of protecting civil rights. That is of course, if aren’t prohibited to exercise your First Amendment rights by local laws or arrest. In the past several years, numerous incidences of people recording police encounters and subsequently being arrested have been reported and have now prompted state action. Once such occurrence involved a woman in Rochester, New York, taping an officer perform a traffic stop while standing on her own property. Although the officer warned her to go inside her home several times, she refused and was ultimately arrested and charged with obstructing governmental administration. Another more recent episode occurred in Pearl, Mississippi, where


Feds Continue Push to Expand Internet Jurisdiction

The Stop Online Piracy Act that would have greatly expanded U.S. law enforcements censorship power over the internet was met with considerable criticism, particularly from tech giants such as Google and Wikipedia. Ultimately, due to this backlash, the bill was buried. However, the apparent (though likely temporary) demise of SOPA hasn’t slowed the federal government’s efforts to regulate the internet. Although seemingly intended to address national security and intellectual property rights, the sought regulatory powers raise serious privacy and freedom of information concerns. Although ongoing for some time, the push has culminated in recent months. In March, Senator John McCain purposed a bill that would encourage voluntary information sharing between private companies and defense agencies. Specifically, the bill encourages companies, such as internet service providers, to send evidence of “network activity or protocols known to be associated with a malicious cyber actor or that may signify malicious intent.” However, as


Television's Influence in the Courtroom

by Amy Y. Americans spend a great amount of time watching television. The only activities that take up more of our time are sleeping and working.  A typical American household has a television turned on for an average of seven hours a day, and what is viewed on that television has an influence on viewers’ beliefs and attitudes.  Considering almost 1/3 of primetime entertainment since the 1960s has related to law enforcement and crime, there is a great possibility for TV viewing to affect individual’s roles in society as voters, jurors, and legal clients.  Individuals often integrate ideas from TV into their beliefs about real world systems. Take for example, Law and Order, the longest running crime drama on American primetime television.   Every 60-minute episode of Law and Order follows the same structure – a crime is discovered (usually in the opening scene), the crime is investigated in the first