The Debt

By Scott In THE DEBT, three Israeli secret agents embark on a mission to capture a Nazi doctor who performed heinous experiments on Jews in concentration camps during the Holocaust.  The year is 1966 and the Nazi is living peacefully in East Berlin under a different name; he works as an OBGYN.  One of the Israeli secret agents, the woman of the group, must undergo examinations by the Nazi, under the premise that she is trying to become pregnant but is having trouble doing so.  The examination scenes are shot so that the viewer is gripped by the emotions of the female agent: as she lies on her back, her legs in stirrups and the Nazi’s hands feeling the inside of her cervix, the agent struggles to deal with the images of her family members who were lost in the holocaust, possibly at the very same camps at which the


Maybe We Just Need Robots

By Chris G. If you have turned on ESPN within the last few days, I’m sure you have heard, over and over again, the endless discussions concerning the NFL referee issue. For those who are either not big NFL fans, the NFL is currently experiencing a lockout, not of its players, but of its referees. While I won’t go into the specifics of the current referee lockout, the NFL is essentially using individuals who truly should not be involved in influencing the outcome of a high school football game, never mind a professional one. The bottom line is that the men and women (yes that is correct, the NFL is currently seeing its first female referee) who are on the field every weekend simply should not be there, and the media, fans and players alike are all searching for every reason to remove them from the game. While I certainly


Morality Through A Self-Serving Lens?

By Maria Biaggi Ethics are defined as “moral principles that govern a person’s or group’s behavior.” So legal ethics should presumably be the set of moral principles that govern a lawyer’s behavior or one involved in the legal sector? However, the divergence that exists between the legal and the moral can be disheartening.  As Thane Rosenbaum elucidates in his book “The Myth of Moral Justice”, fundamental distinctions between right and wrong are not always the same as achieving the correct legal result. There is often a similar juxtaposition between the right moral decision and the right business decision.  It is important to emphasize, however, that doing what is morally right can also be in the best interest of the person acting under the law.  In his article “When Capitalists Cared”,  Hendrick Smith calls on the wisdom of Henry Ford in urging business elite to stop hiding behind the political rhetoric


11th Anniversary of 9/11 Focuses on Victims, Not Politicians

By Greg Cage This week marked the 11th anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan that killed nearly 3,000 people. The tradition over the past ten years has been for public officials to memorialize the tragedy with speeches and photo opportunities.  But despite the fact that this year was the first time the ceremony was held on the 9/11 Memorial Plaza, no elected officials spoke.  There were no planned readings, and the families of the victims were not limited to simply stating a name.  For the first time, the focus was solely on the victims and their families. Some family members told stories, some read poems, others thanked the first responders and the military.  All of this had been done at other ceremonies over the past 11 years, but for the first time this was the sole focus of the event.  Each person was the